Much ado about nothing

It’s been over a month since I  resigned from my NGO work, and the first few weeks were not pretty. Shortly after I resigned, I discovered that my expenses were too much. I was enjoying but at the same time I was losing so much money. My last salary became zero in less than a week! Although I live with my parents, I no longer receive daily allowance from them, unlike when I was in college.  I’m not used to having NOTHING TO DO, so I thought of ways of having fun without leaving the house. Movies, TV series, then there was Postcrossing.

IMG-20141014-00092-2Is this my life now?

It has been four months since I discovered Postcrossing. Soon after my resignation, I became active on the Postcrossing group on Facebook, making postcard swap deals and lotteries. My favorite thing to do nowadays is preparing postcards (because I’m too broke for book shopping).

In my four months of postcard shopping, sad to say this, but I’ve  discovered that most Philippine postcards do not give justice to the beauty of the places they represent. Some postcards have weird angles, some aren’t sharp, and some look like they were shot back in the 1980s. I don’t even want to talk about the fonts, borders, etc. (Yes, Comic Sans is very much alive!)

Although this is the case, I found a few attractive ones.

Philippine viewcards12 Pesos/piece

HD viewcardsP25/pc

P35/piece

Prices of Postcards at National Bookstore range from P12 to P35. (FYI, the 12-peso postcards are sold at Fully Booked for P25, which is more than half the price at NBS. )

10383550_10202800302431870_2118538063857753818_n

Tip: Get copies of the map card, the tricycle, and the Banaue Rice Terraces. They’re a hit! I never seem to have enough copies of these. I only bought one copy each for the P25-P35 postcards for obvious reasons.

Fortunately, my  Dad had a few postcards which he willingly handed over to  me. (For him, they’re a throw away.  But he’s a homeboy and he receives my postcards so he knew I needed them.)  I also found old postcards at selected branches of NBS for P1.50-P4.50 each!

Some of Dad’s postcards + Old postcards at NBS

Do not underestimate old postcards. If you spot a < 5-peso postcard, buy it. Old, especially if rare, postcards can still prove to be attractive.

This postcard is on its way to St. Wendel, Germany, its new home.

 My dad’s old postcard will be used as a visual aid by a Palestine-based American teacher.

Some of my Dad’s postcards have stains at the back, but I’m not letting them go because most of them are no longer produced/sold. Fortunately, my sister lets me use her stickers. I also bought a few washi tapes which I use for the  borders. DSC_4369 I treat every correspondent as a potential friend.  I go beyond giving my postcard pals the postcard they want; I maximize the blank space at the back for self-introduction and in gving them a glimpse of what the Philippines is like. Since I have a bad penmanship, I use washi tapes and stickers to make sure the back’s as visually appealing as the front.

DSC_4290DSC_4289Need art. Suggestions?

DSC_4265 I also need an extra help in sealing my envelopes. So here’s where washi tapes prove to be useful too. There’s the return address, right in the middle.

Sill jobless (obviously, and I repeat), I take advantage of my much-needed free time  to know more about the things I have a penchant for (foreign cultures, languages, and literatures), do the things I  had very little time to do when I was studying and working,  and meet people who share the same interests as me. Sure, these things can be experienced when traveling. I kinda wish I can travel as often as my jet setter friends and older relatives do. But I’m at this stage wherein I need to save more and spend less for my future.

Isn’t Postcrossing the perfect excuse to explain why I’ve been jobless for more than a month now? I highly recommend it to wanderlusting  third-world passport holders like me, and I hope through this blog, I can draw people to join the bandwagon.

Namaste.

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